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Operation Food Rescue: Have you seen fruit rotting in people's yards or trees bursting with so much bounty and so surrounded by groundfall produce that you are sure the property owner would be willing to share their treats of nature? Contact us at 707-955-9898 with the property leads or click the button to print out our information card to leave on their doorstep. This is precious nutrition for families who are struggling. 
 

HELP BE THE BRIDGE BETWEEN ABUNDANCE AND NEED!

 


Olive

Give gifts that "give back" with Farm to Pantry. Support local farmers and fight food insecurity with olive oil! Help those in need have a table adorned with local, nutritious produce.
The "No One Left Behind" Olive Oil is extra virgin and extra local: olives from local orchards and backyards, harvested by volunteers & milled in Dry Creek. The label artwork is always the handiwork of Sonoma County students. It is a great party host gift or to accompany a birthday card when people get wine-fatigued - it's truly unique and special. Yours with a $100 donation to Farm to Pantry or get a six-pack for $500.


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Farm to Pantry is committed to rescuing food that would otherwise go wasted and getting it to people in need. The food is out there; all we have to do is go get it. No one should be left behind.

Farm to Pantry started with a walk…

around a Healdsburg neighborhood. Our founder, Melita Love, saw so many fruit trees in her neighbors’ yards with once-beautiful fruit rotting on the ground beneath them. She thought what a shame it was to see waste like that when 1 in 4 people in Sonoma County are facing food insecurity. So, she DID something about it. Learn more in “Our Story.”

 

We support BIPOC, LGBTQIA+ and Marginalized/ Underserved Communities.

You can read about our values in detail here: values.

“I think, how can a singer make so much money when a person — a farmworker — works so physically hard to bring food to people’s tables and makes so little,” Bernardina Medrano said in the LA Times. “I wish people would come and try to do the work we do. I think they would learn a lot.”

 

 

 

 

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